PESA Members’ Books

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Bleazby, Jennifer, Social Reconstruction Learning: Dualism, Dewey and Philosophy in Schools, (Routledge) 2013

This volume argues that educational problems have their basis in an ideology of binary opposites often referred to as dualism, which is deeply embedded in all aspects of Western society and philosophy, and that it is partly because mainstream schooling incorporates dualism that it is unable to facilitate the thinking skills, dispositions and understandings necessary for autonomy, democratic citizenship and leading a meaningful life. Drawing on the philosophy of John Dewey, feminist pragmatism, Matthew Lipman’s Philosophy for Children program, and the service learning movement, Bleazby proposes an approach to schooling termed "social reconstruction learning," in which students engage in philosophical inquiries with members of their community in order to reconstruct real social problems, arguing that this pedagogy can better facilitate independent thinking, imaginativeness, emotional intelligence, autonomy, and active citizenship.

Engels-Schwarzpaul, A.-Chr., & Peters, M. A. (Eds.), Of Other Thoughts: Non-traditional ways to the doctorate. A guidebook for candidates and supervisors, (Sense Publishers : Rotterdam, Netherlands) 2013

Of Other Thoughts offers a path-breaking critique of the traditions underpinning doctoral research. Working against the grain of traditional research orthodoxies, graduate researchers (almost all from Indigenous, transnational, diasporic, coloured, queer and ethnic minorities) AND their supervisors offer insights into non-traditional and emergent modes of research—transcultural, post-colonial, trans-disciplinary and creative practice-led. Through case studies and contextualizing essays, Of Other Thoughts provides a unique guide to doctoral candidates and supervisors working with different modes of research. More radically, its questioning of traditional assumptions about the nature of the literature review, the genealogy of research practices, and the status and structuring of the thesis creates openings for alternative modes of researching. It gives our emerging researchers the courage to differ and challenges the University to take up its public role as critic and conscience of society.

Barbara Bolt | Associate Professor and Associate Director of Research and Research Training | The Victorian College of the Arts |University of Melbourne | Australia

These writings are essential reading for all PhD students interested in making their critical work count for more. They examine multiple sites where conservative politics and ethics, institutional regulations, culturally constrained supervisory practices, and disciplinary boundary maintenance run counter to the radical and transforming potential of critical PhD work.

Graham Hingangaroa Smith | Distinguished Professor | Vice-Chancellor/Chief Executive Officer | Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi| Whakatāne | Aotearoa – New Zealand

This book makes a distinctive and valuable contribution to the growing literature on doctoral education. Readers will find a wonderfully diverse collection of perspectives on non-traditional paths to the PhD. The book synthesises theory with practice in a highly effective and engaging manner

John O'Toole and David Beckett, Educational Research: Creative Thinking and Doing, (Oxford University Press : Melbourne) 2013

Second edition of this well-received textbook for the expert educational practitioner who is beginning or underway in a research degree, such as a PhD or a DEd. Also helpful for those doing 'capstone' projects in Masters degrees. The conceptual approach is explicitly Wittgensteinian: 'back to the rough ground' of practice(s). First edition was 2010. Nothing from that was deleted. Various improvements include updated qualitative methodology sections and more examples of actual theses.

Lam, Chi-Ming, Childhood, Philosophy and Open Society: Implications for Education in Confucian Heritage Cultures, (Springer) 2013

The purpose of this book is to develop a theory and practice of education from Karl Popper’s falsificationist philosophy for promoting an open society. Specifically, the book is designed to develop an educational programme for achieving Popper’s ideal of fostering critical thinking in children for full participation in an open democratic society.

Arguing that Matthew Lipman’s Philosophy for Children (P4C) programme can fulfil the requirements of Popper’s educational ideal in schools, this study conducted an experiment to assess the effectiveness of the programme in promoting students’ critical thinking in Hong Kong, China – arguably a Confucian heritage society. The students who were taught P4C were found to perform better in the reasoning test than those who were not, to be capable of discussing philosophical problems in a competent way, and to have a very positive attitude towards doing philosophy in the classroom. It was also found that P4C played a major role in developing the students’ critical thinking.

Considering that the construction of children by adults as incompetent in the sense of lacking reason, maturity, or independence reinforces the traditional structure of adult authority over children in society, it runs counter to the goal of fostering critical thinking in children. As a way to return justice to childhood and to effectively promote critical thinking in children, this study suggested reconstructing the concept of childhood, highlighting the importance of establishing a coherent public policy on promotion of agency in children and also the importance of empowering them to participate actively in research, legal, and educational institutions.

Peters, Michael A., Citizenship, Human Rights and Identity: Prospects of a Liberal Cosmopolitan Order, (Addleton Academic Publications : New York) 2013

This book focuses on the notion of citizenship in relation to the notions of
human rights, identity and culture. It poses the question of the prospects of a
liberal cosmopolitan order dealing with a number of interrelated themes:
ethics, emancipation and what Derrida calls the “new humanities;” identity,
war and crimes against humanity; citizenship, and education rights within a
knowledge economy; colonization, development and peace; changing notions
of democracy within an information society; and culture, difference and
otherness. These are the themes that make problematic aspects of the liberal
cosmopolitan order. One of the main tropes connecting these themes is how
the primary liberal values of freedom, emancipation and equality work out in
a globalized world. The interrelationship of these values are problematized in
different settings as they relate to issues of global world order with a focus on
the adaptability of the liberal framework of values and law in creating a
genuine cosmopolitan order.

Peters, Michael A., Education, Science and Knowledge Capitalism: Creativity and the Promise of Openness, (Peter Lang) 2013

We live in the age of global science - but not, primarily, in the sense of 'universal knowledge' that has characterized the liberal metanarrative of 'free' science and the 'free society' since its early development in the Enlightenment. Today, an economic logic links science to national economic policy, while globalized multinational science dominates an environment where quality assurance replaces truth as the new regulative ideal. This book examines the nature of educational and science-based capitalism in its cybernetic, knowledge, algorithmic and bioinformational forms before turning to the emergence of the global science system and the promise of openness in the growth of international research collaboration, the development of the global knowledge commons and the rise of the open science economy. Education, Science and Knowledge Capitalism explores the nature of cognitive capitalism, the emerging mode of social production for public education and science and its promise for the democratization of knowledge.

Edited by Peters, Michael A. & Besley, Tina, The Creative University, (Sense : Rotterdam) 2013

The concept of the “Creative University” signals that higher education stands at the center of the creative economy indicating the growing significance of intellectual capital and innovation for economic growth and cultural development. Increasingly economic activity is socialised through new media and depends on immaterial and digital goods.

This immaterial economy includes new international labour markets that demand analytic skills, global competencies and an understanding of markets in tradeable knowledges. Delivery modes in education are being reshaped. Global cultures are spreading in the form of knowledge and research networks.

Openness, networking, cross-border people movement, flows of ideas, capital and scholars are changing the conditions of imagining and producing creative work. The economic aspect of creativity refers to the production of new ideas, aesthetic forms, scholarship, original works of art and cultural products, as well as scientific inventions and technological innovations. It embraces both open source communication as well as commercial intellectual property.

This collection explores these ideas as the basis for a new development agenda for universities.

The chapters that form this edited book are a selection of papers given at an international conference held called The Creative University held at the University of Waikato on 15-17 August 2102. This conference investigated all the aspects of education in (and as) the creative economy.

Edited by Peters, Michael A., Besley, Tina, & Araya, Daniel, The New Development Paradigm: Education, Knowledge Economy and Digital Futures, (Peter Lang : New York) 2013

Although the concept of «development education» has been widely adopted, the term is still not widely understood. With the advent of globalization, the knowledge economy, and, in particular, the formulation of the World Bank’s «knowledge for development» strategy and the UNDP’s «creative economy», development issues have become a central part of education and education has become central to development. It is time to reassess the standard development education paradigm and to investigate the possibilities that take into account emerging trends. The New Development Paradigm, written by international authorities, focuses on three related themes: education, the knowledge economy and openness; social networking, new media and social entrepreneurship in education; and technology, innovation and participatory networks.

Quay, John, John Dewey and Education Outdoors, (Sense Publishers) 2013

In this book we take the reader on a journey through the various curriculum reforms that have emerged in the USA around the idea of conducting education outdoors – through initiatives such as nature-study, camping education, adventure education, environmental education, experiential education and place based education. This is a historical journey with an underlying message for educators, one we are able to illuminate through the educational theories of John Dewey. Central to this message is a deeper understanding of human experience as both aesthetic and reflective, leading to a more coherent comprehension of not just outdoor education, but of education itself.

Roberts, P. & Peters, M.A., Better Worlds: Education, Art, and Utopia, (Lexington Books) 2013

Better Worlds: Education, Art, and Utopia provides a fresh examination of utopia and education. Adopting an interdisciplinary approach and drawing on literature and the visual arts as well as traditional non-fiction sources, the authors explore utopia not as a model of social perfection but as the active, imaginative building of better worlds. Utopian questions, they argue, lie at the heart of education, and addressing such questions demands attention not just to matters of theoretical principle but to the particulars of everyday life and experience. Taking utopia seriously in educational thought also involves a consideration of that which is dystopian. Utopia, this book suggests, is not something that is fixed, final, or ever fully realized; instead, it must be constantly recreated, and education, as an ongoing process of reflection, action, and transformation, has a central role to play in this process.

Benade, L.W., From Technicians to Teachers: Ethical Teaching in the Context of Globalized Education Reform., (Continuum International : New York) 2012

From Technicians to Teachers provides theoretical and practical reasons for suggesting that widespread, international curriculum reform of the post-1990 period need not deprofessionalise teaching. The widely held deprofessionalisation thesis is both compelling and fatalistic, leading to a despairing sense that teachers are either no more than technicians, or that they can be reprofessionalised through definitions of ‘effective teachers' promoted by the reforms. However, there are many teachers who do not see their work in either of these ways.

The book is structured around an in-depth case study detailing the implementation of The New Zealand Curriculum in that nation - one of the best international examples of neoliberal reform. Benade argues that curriculum policy can and should be analysed critically, while pointing out the dangers for ethical teachers that can exist in national or state curricula.

Energising and inspiring, this book reminds teachers and teacher educators that although they work in a globalised context, their own role is fundamental and has a profoundly ethical basis, despite the negative impacts of three decades of education reform.

Edited by Besley, Tina & Peters, Michael A., Interculturalism, Education and Dialogue, (Peter Lang) 2012

Intercultural dialogue is a concept and discourse that dates back to the 1980s. It is the major means for managing diversity and strengthening democracy within Europe and beyond. It has been adopted by the United Nations, UNESCO and the Council of Europe as the basis for interreligious and interfaith initiatives and has become increasingly associated with a liberal theory of modernity and internationalism that presupposes freedom, democracy, human rights and tolerance. It is now the dominant paradigm for 'cultural policy' and the educational basis for the development of intercultural understanding. Governments have placed their hope in intercultural education as the way to avoid the worst excesses of globalization, especially exclusion and marginalization, and the problems of xenophobia and racism that afflict European societies. Interculturalism, Education and Dialogue is an international collection by renowned scholars who examine the ideological underpinnings of the European model and its global applications. It explores the historical, philosophical and educational dimensions of intercultural dialogue.

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PESA does not sell or take commission from any of the books listed on this website.

PESA does not sell or take commission from any of the books listed on this website.

PESA does not sell or take commission from any of the books listed on this website.

PESA does not sell or take commission from any of the books listed on this website.

PESA does not sell or take commission from any of the books listed on this website.

PESA does not sell or take commission from any of the books listed on this website.

PESA does not sell or take commission from any of the books listed on this website.

PESA does not sell or take commission from any of the books listed on this website.

PESA does not sell or take commission from any of the books listed on this website.

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