PESA Members’ Books

PESA does not sell or take commission from any of the books listed on this website.

Edited by Peters, Michael A., Paraskeva, João M., & Besley, Tina (A.C.), The Global Financial Crisis & Educational Restructuring, (Peter Lang : New York) 2015

The worldwide integration and globalization of finance, an aspect of «financialization», coincided with the rise of market-oriented neoliberalism promoting free trade and privatization strategies. New Internet-based technologies have reinforced financial market integration, creating a fragile, globally integrated financial ecosystem that poses new systemic risks and contagion effects characterized by excessive borrowing and ballooning debt, massive asset bubbles, a huge shadow banking system, and financial innovation leading to collateralized debt obligation and securitization. Public education has been at the core of neoliberal privatization strategies and financialization with the trillion-dollar blowout of student loans. Education, once considered a national and global public good tied to the creation of knowledge and the basis of a just and democratic society, has undergone a profound transformation and financial restructuring. This collection of essays by a range of international experts addresses the root causes of this massive change, analyzing the growth of finance capitalism and financialization, as well as the financialization of education and its consequences. The book is a valuable resource for classes in educational reform, education policy, higher education, and educational finance.

Quay, John, Understanding life in school: From academic classroom to outdoor education, (Palgrave Macmillan : London) 2015

We've all been to school, so what could be simpler than understanding life in school? The problem is that we take school for granted, accepting it for what it is without asking too many questions. This leaves us tinkering around the edges when it comes to school reform. A deeper understanding of life in school is required, which this book seeks to offer by going to the source of the matter itself – the young people who are in the midst of the day-to-day routines of school life. Much is revealed by contrasting their experiences in academic classrooms and school camp, insights that remain invisible without this juxtaposition. Key to analysis of these experiences is an understanding of life as occupational, constituted through many and various ways of being. This highlights the importance to teaching and learning of addressing the issue of who we are, not just what we know.
"This book is a "must read" for educators. It is so because it is animated by a principle which claims that it is more important to help students become well-rounded beings than to transmit to them tidbits of knowledge. Study its manifestation with care, then act upon it."
Philip W. Jackson - David Lee Shillinglaw Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus in the Departments of Education and Psychology at the University of Chicago, USA
"This book is a worthy companion to Philip W. Jackson's Life in Classrooms. It addresses the complexities of life in schools, providing a rich account of how students interpret and negotiate these complexities. In an analysis that is both philosophically astute and highly accessible, John Quay shows how education for these students is about much more than knowing – it is about being and becoming."
Fazal Rizvi - Professor in Global Studies in Education at the University of Melbourne, Australia and Emeritus Professor at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA

Rule, Peter, Dialogue and Boundary Learning, (Sense Publishers : Rotterdam) 2015

In an increasingly monologic world of war, exploitation and fear of “the other”, dialogue within and between humans, and with the world around us, is critical to a humane future.
This book explores dialogue and learning in theory, practice and praxis across a spectrum of lifelong education contexts. It develops a philosophical basis by examining the lives, works and dialogic traditions of four key thinkers: Socrates, Martin Buber, Mikhail Bakhtin and Paulo Freire. It then examines dialogue and learning in contexts ranging from early childhood development to adult, community and higher education. In doing so, it develops and illustrates the innovative concepts of dialogic space, boundary learning and diacognition. It has a specific focus on learners and learning in contexts of oppression and marginality, and with a view to personal and social emancipation. It is located in an African context, specifically South Africa, although its resonance is both local and global.
The book marks an innovative contribution to our understanding of dialogue and learning, framed by the great dialogic traditions of the past, and is a dialogical provocation to the ongoing generation of praxis.
“This book is valuable for grounding lifelong learning experiences within an African context. It underlines the complexities involved in carrying out ‘authentic’ dialogue at different stages of education in Africa throughout the lifespan, exploring cases of border crossing and boundary maintenance.” – Peter Mayo, University of Malta and Series Editor of the International Issues in Adult Education Series

Dr Si Belkacem TAIEB, Decolonizing Indigenous Education: An Amazigh-Berber Ethnographic journey, (Palgrave MacMillan : New York) 2014

In this work exploring the Kabyle people of Algeria and their educational journeys, Si Belkacem Taieb explores an epistemological and ontological framework for Kabyle education. He does so by undertaking a narrative inquiry: an auto-ethnographic journey, in which the journey of one's self and the journey of one's people are inextricably intertwined.In a postcolonial cultural journey in an indigenous, North African Kabyle landscape and the development of an Amazigh educational philosophy, Taieb writes the sociological foundations of an Amazigh educational system: one that removes Amazigh education from its colonial heritage and restores it to the people who create and use it.

Jackson, Liz, Muslims and Islam in U.S. Education: Reconsidering Multiculturalism, (Routledge) 2014

Muslims and Islam in U.S. Education explores the complex interface that exists between the U.S. school curriculum, teaching practice about religion in public schools, societal and teacher attitudes toward Islam and Muslims, and multiculturalism as a framework for meeting the needs of minority group students. It presents multiculturalism as a concept that needs to be rethought and reformulated in the interest of creating a more democratic, inclusive, and informed society.

Islam is an under-considered religion in American education, due in part to the fact that Muslims represent a very small minority of the population today (less than 1%). However, this group faces a crucial challenge of representation in United States society as a whole, as well as in its schools. Muslims in the United States are impacted by ignorance that news and opinion polls have demonstrated is widespread among the public in the last few decades. U.S. citizens who do not have a balanced, fair and accurate view of Islam can make a variety of decisions in the voting booth, in job hiring, and within their small-scale but important personal networks and spheres of influence, that make a very negative impact on Muslims in the United States.

This book presents new information that has implications for curricula, religious education, and multicultural education today, examining the unique case of Islam in U.S. education over the last 20 years.

This book is an essential resource for professors, researchers, and teachers of social studies, particularly those involved with multicultural issues, critical and sociocultural analysis of education and schools; as well as interdisciplinary scholars and students in anthropology and education.

Preface provided by Nicholas C. Burbules, University of Illinios, Urbana-Champaign.

Edited by Lazariou, George, Liber amicorum: A Philosophical Conversation among Friends • A Festschrift for Michael A. Peters, (Addleton Academic Publications : New York) 2014

The notion of an academic friendship implied in “book of friends” -- Liber amicorum -- suggests a mutual caring about ideas and their representation, an intimacy that differs from the impersonal and bureaucratic relationships that distinguish neoliberal universities, and shared activity in the joint pursuits of conferences, seminars, books and papers implied in co-authorship, in a shared body of literature, in shared perspectives. Academic friendship is built into the notion of philosophy and is not only a shared love of wisdom in the original Greek meaning of the term but an essential relation that is at the basis of being a colleague: it is inherent in the idea of dialogue, communication and the very possibility of conversation.

This Romantic analysis that revolves around academic exchange, mutual acknowledgement, and shared standards of scholarship stands in marked contrast to the knowledge hoarding and privatisation of research that characterises the neoliberal university that imposes its industrial line management psychology to police, monitor and increasingly spy on the performativity of its faculty. In the “university of friends” it is our special responsibility to be critical of one another and to learn to take criticism in a positive sense as the lifeblood of scholarship: criticism without meanness, without rancour, and without nastiness.

Stolz, Steven, The Philosophy of Education: A New Perspective, (Routledge) 2014

The discipline area of physical education has historically struggled for legitimacy, sometimes being seen as a non-serious pursuit in educational terms compared to other subjects within the school curriculum. This book represents the first attempt in nearly 30 years to offer a coherent philosophical defence and conceptualisation of physical education and sport as subjects of educational value, and to provide a philosophically sound justification for their inclusion in the curriculum.

The book argues that rather than relegating the body to ‘un-thinking’ learning, a person’s essential being is not confined to their rationality but involves an embodied dimension. It traces the changing conceptions of the body, in philosophy and theology, that have influenced our understanding of physical education and sport, and investigates the important role that embodiment and movement play in learning about, through and in physical education. Physical education is defended as a vital and necessary part of education because the whole person goes to school, not just the mind, but the thinking, feeling and acting facets of a person. It is argued that physical education has the potential to provide a multitude of experiences and opportunities for students to become aware of their embodiment, explore alternative modes of awareness and to develop insights into and new modes of being not available elsewhere in the curriculum, and to influence moral character through the support of a moral community that is committed to that practice.

Representing a sophisticated and spirited defence of the educational significance and philosophical value of physical education and sport, this book will be fascinating reading for any advanced student or researcher with an interest in physical education, the philosophy of sport, or the philosophy of education.

Edited by Besley, Tina & Peters, Michael A., Re-imagining the Creative University for the 21st Century, (Sense : Rotterdam) 2013

The creative university is a new concept that has a number of competing conceptions emphasizing digital teaching, learning and research infrastructures, the paradigm of intellectual property, creative social development and academic entrepreneurship. Not only does the concept include the fostering and critique of creative content industries and new forms of distance and online education but more fundamentally it refers to a reassessment of neoliberal strategies to build the knowledge economy. The economic aspect of creativity refers to the production of new ideas, aesthetic forms, scholarship, original works of art and cultural products, as well as scientific inventions and technological innovations. It embraces open source communication as well as commercial intellectual property. All of this positions education at the center of the economy/ creativity nexus. But are education systems, institutions, assumptions and habits positioned and able so as to seize the opportunities and meet the challenges? This book uses different contexts to explore these vital issues.

 

Bleazby, Jennifer, Social Reconstruction Learning: Dualism, Dewey and Philosophy in Schools, (Routledge) 2013

This volume argues that educational problems have their basis in an ideology of binary opposites often referred to as dualism, which is deeply embedded in all aspects of Western society and philosophy, and that it is partly because mainstream schooling incorporates dualism that it is unable to facilitate the thinking skills, dispositions and understandings necessary for autonomy, democratic citizenship and leading a meaningful life. Drawing on the philosophy of John Dewey, feminist pragmatism, Matthew Lipman’s Philosophy for Children program, and the service learning movement, Bleazby proposes an approach to schooling termed "social reconstruction learning," in which students engage in philosophical inquiries with members of their community in order to reconstruct real social problems, arguing that this pedagogy can better facilitate independent thinking, imaginativeness, emotional intelligence, autonomy, and active citizenship.

Engels-Schwarzpaul, A.-Chr., & Peters, M. A. (Eds.), Of Other Thoughts: Non-traditional ways to the doctorate. A guidebook for candidates and supervisors, (Sense Publishers : Rotterdam, Netherlands) 2013

Of Other Thoughts offers a path-breaking critique of the traditions underpinning doctoral research. Working against the grain of traditional research orthodoxies, graduate researchers (almost all from Indigenous, transnational, diasporic, coloured, queer and ethnic minorities) AND their supervisors offer insights into non-traditional and emergent modes of research—transcultural, post-colonial, trans-disciplinary and creative practice-led. Through case studies and contextualizing essays, Of Other Thoughts provides a unique guide to doctoral candidates and supervisors working with different modes of research. More radically, its questioning of traditional assumptions about the nature of the literature review, the genealogy of research practices, and the status and structuring of the thesis creates openings for alternative modes of researching. It gives our emerging researchers the courage to differ and challenges the University to take up its public role as critic and conscience of society.

Barbara Bolt | Associate Professor and Associate Director of Research and Research Training | The Victorian College of the Arts |University of Melbourne | Australia

These writings are essential reading for all PhD students interested in making their critical work count for more. They examine multiple sites where conservative politics and ethics, institutional regulations, culturally constrained supervisory practices, and disciplinary boundary maintenance run counter to the radical and transforming potential of critical PhD work.

Graham Hingangaroa Smith | Distinguished Professor | Vice-Chancellor/Chief Executive Officer | Te Whare Wānanga o Awanuiārangi| Whakatāne | Aotearoa – New Zealand

This book makes a distinctive and valuable contribution to the growing literature on doctoral education. Readers will find a wonderfully diverse collection of perspectives on non-traditional paths to the PhD. The book synthesises theory with practice in a highly effective and engaging manner

John O'Toole and David Beckett, Educational Research: Creative Thinking and Doing, (Oxford University Press : Melbourne) 2013

Second edition of this well-received textbook for the expert educational practitioner who is beginning or underway in a research degree, such as a PhD or a DEd. Also helpful for those doing 'capstone' projects in Masters degrees. The conceptual approach is explicitly Wittgensteinian: 'back to the rough ground' of practice(s). First edition was 2010. Nothing from that was deleted. Various improvements include updated qualitative methodology sections and more examples of actual theses.

Lam, Chi-Ming, Childhood, Philosophy and Open Society: Implications for Education in Confucian Heritage Cultures, (Springer) 2013

The purpose of this book is to develop a theory and practice of education from Karl Popper’s falsificationist philosophy for promoting an open society. Specifically, the book is designed to develop an educational programme for achieving Popper’s ideal of fostering critical thinking in children for full participation in an open democratic society.

Arguing that Matthew Lipman’s Philosophy for Children (P4C) programme can fulfil the requirements of Popper’s educational ideal in schools, this study conducted an experiment to assess the effectiveness of the programme in promoting students’ critical thinking in Hong Kong, China – arguably a Confucian heritage society. The students who were taught P4C were found to perform better in the reasoning test than those who were not, to be capable of discussing philosophical problems in a competent way, and to have a very positive attitude towards doing philosophy in the classroom. It was also found that P4C played a major role in developing the students’ critical thinking.

Considering that the construction of children by adults as incompetent in the sense of lacking reason, maturity, or independence reinforces the traditional structure of adult authority over children in society, it runs counter to the goal of fostering critical thinking in children. As a way to return justice to childhood and to effectively promote critical thinking in children, this study suggested reconstructing the concept of childhood, highlighting the importance of establishing a coherent public policy on promotion of agency in children and also the importance of empowering them to participate actively in research, legal, and educational institutions.

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PESA does not sell or take commission from any of the books listed on this website.

PESA does not sell or take commission from any of the books listed on this website.

PESA does not sell or take commission from any of the books listed on this website.

PESA does not sell or take commission from any of the books listed on this website.

PESA does not sell or take commission from any of the books listed on this website.

PESA does not sell or take commission from any of the books listed on this website.

PESA does not sell or take commission from any of the books listed on this website.

PESA does not sell or take commission from any of the books listed on this website.

PESA does not sell or take commission from any of the books listed on this website.

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