The PESA Book Award honours a PESA member whose recent authored or edited book has been formally judged by a committee to be significant to philosophy of education. Members may be nominated or self nominate. View Policy Document.

2018

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Laura D’Olimpio (2017) Media and Moral Education: A Philosophy of Critical Engagement Routledge.

https://www.routledge.com/Media-and-Moral-Education-A-Philosophy-of-Critical-Engagement-1st-Edition/DOlimpio/p/book/9781138291423

Media and Moral Education demonstrates that the study of philosophy can be used to enhance critical thinking skills, which are sorely needed in today’s technological age. It addresses the current oversight of the educational environment not keeping pace with rapid advances in technology, despite the fact that educating students to engage critically and compassionately with others via online media is of the utmost importance.

 

2017

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Carl Mika (2017) Indigenous Education and the Metaphysics of Presence: A worlded philosophy. Routledge.

https://www.routledge.com/Indigenous-Education-and-the-Metaphysics-of-Presence-A-Worlded-Philosophy/Mika/p/book/9781138846302

Indigenous Education and the Metaphysics of Presence: A worlded philosophy explores a notion of education called ‘worldedness’ that sits at the core of indigenous philosophy. This is the idea that any one thing is constituted by all others and is, therefore, educational to the extent that it is formational. A suggested opposite of this indigenous philosophy is the metaphysics of presence, which describes the tendency in dominant Western philosophy to privilege presence over absence. This book compares these competing philosophies and argues that, even though the metaphysics of presence and the formational notion of education are at odds with each other, they also constitute each other from an indigenous worlded philosophical viewpoint.

 

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Peter Roberts (2016). Happiness, hope, and despair: Rethinking the role of education. Peter Lang.

https://www.peterlang.com/view/title/22256

In the Western world it is usually taken as given that we all want happiness, and our educational arrangements tacitly acknowledge this. Happiness, Hope, and Despair argues, however, that education has an important role to play in deepening our understanding of suffering and despair as well as happiness and joy. Education can be uncomfortable, unpredictable, and unsettling; it can lead to greater uncertainty and unhappiness. Drawing on the work of Søren Kierkegaard, Miguel de Unamuno, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Simone Weil, Paulo Freire, and others, Peter Roberts shows why these features of educational life need not be feared; to the contrary, they can be seen as a source of hope and human fulfilment.

 

2016

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John Quay (2015) Understanding Life in School: From Academic Classroom to Outdoor Education. Palgrave Macmillan.

https://www.palgrave.com/gp/book/9781137391223

Attending school is an experience that most people share but this leads us to accept rather than question the experience. Using the philosophies of Heidegger and Dewey, John Quay explores life in schools and juxtaposes the environment of a school camp with that of an academic classroom. The book attempts to show how the old dichotomy between knowing and doing (manifesting in one guise as core academic subjects versus co-curricular activities) can be overcome by looking beyond knowing and doing, to being. Being does not replace knowing and doing, but rather offers a deeper comprehension of life which encapsulates both. The message here is that knowing and doing are always situated or contextualised ontologically (in Heidegger’s phenomenological understanding of that term).

 

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Jayne White, (2016) Introducing Dialogic Pedagogies: Provocations for the Early Years. Routledge

https://www.routledge.com/Introducing-Dialogic-Pedagogy-Provocations-for-the-Early-Years-1st-Edition/White/p/book/9780415819855

Introducing Dialogic Pedagogy presents some of the ideas of Russian philosopher Mikhail Bakhtin concerning dialogism in a way that will engage and inspire those studying early childhood education. By translating the growing body of dialogic scholarship into a practical application of teaching and learning with very young children, this book provides readers with alternative ways of examining, engaging and reflecting on practice in the early years to provoke new ways of understanding and enacting pedagogy.

 

2015

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Liz Jackson, (2014) Muslims and Islam in U.S. Education: Reconsidering Multiculturalism. Routledge.

https://www.routledge.com/Muslims-and-Islam-in-US-Education-Reconsidering-multiculturalism-1st/Jackson/p/book/9780415787338

Muslims and Islam in U.S. Education explores the complex interface that exists between U.S. school curriculum, teaching practice about religion in public schools, societal and teacher attitudes toward Islam and Muslims, and multiculturalism as a framework for meeting the needs of minority group students. It presents multiculturalism as a concept that needs to be rethought and reformulated in the interest of creating a more democratic, inclusive, and informed society.

 

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Andrew Stables & Inna Semestky (2014) Edusemiotics: semiotic philosophy as educational foundation. Routledge

https://www.routledge.com/Edusemiotics-Semiotic-philosophy-as-educational-foundation/Stables-Semetsky/p/book/9781138703407

Edusemiotics addresses an emerging field of inquiry, educational semiotics, as a philosophy of and for education. Using "sign" as a unit of analysis, educational semiotics amalgamates philosophy, educational theory and semiotics. Edusemiotics draws on the intellectual legacy of such philosophers as John Dewey, Charles Sanders Peirce, Gilles Deleuze and others across Anglo-American and continental traditions.

 

 

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