PESA Conference 2023

Public Lecture

Being Together in/with Place: Reimagining Educational Philosophies and Pedagogies in Transformational Times
Auckland, New Zealand   6-9 December 2023

Public Lecture

What is ‘Indigenising the academy’ and why attempt it?

 

Date:

Wednesday 6 December

 

Time:

5:30 PM - Cocktail function

6:30 PM - Public Lecture

 

Location:

Cocktail function - Engineering Foyer

Public Lecture - Lecture Theatre 401-439 (Neon Theatre)

 

Registration:

If you are attending PESA Conference 2023, your registration for the Public Lecture is included in your Conference registration.

General public REGISTER HERE

Abstract:

Te Kawehau Hoskins and Alison Jones discuss the increasing interest in the theory and politics of ‘indigenising’ educational institutions in Aotearoa New Zealand. What does indigenising entail and what might be the benefits? They consider some philosophical ideas underpinning an indigenising orientation, and their relevance in these times of intractable global troubles. The speakers draw on their experiences as teachers and leaders at Waipapa Taumata Rau University of Auckland.

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Te Kawehau Hoskins 

Te Kawehau Hoskins affiliates to the people of Ngāti Hau in Whakapara, a community located north of the Whangārei district. She is an associate professor and Ihonuku Pro-Vice Chancellor Māori at Waipapa Taumata Rau The University of Auckland. She leads conversations about Indigenisation in university settings and has expertise in qualitative social and educational research, the politics and ethics of Indigene-settler relations, and kaupapa Māori education.

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Alison Jones

Alison Jones is a Pākehā educational researcher and a professor in Te Puna Wānanga, the School of Māori and Indigenous Education at Waipapa Taumata Rau The University of Auckland. Alison has published two award-winning books with Kuni Kaa Jenkins: He Kōrero: Words Between Us : First Māori–Pākehā Conversations on Paper (2011), and Tuai: A Traveller in Two Worlds. Her book This Pakeha Life: An Unsettled Memoir was shortlisted for the General Non-Fiction Ockham Book Award in 2021. She writes and teaches in the field of Māori-Pākehā relations prior to Te Tiriti o Waitangi, and in modern educational sites. She is interested in the politics of friendship.